Bradley Manning’s statement shows that US intelligence analysts are trained in using Tor

This morning I had the opportunity to help Freedom of the Press Foundation publish the full, previously unreleased audio recording of Bradley Manning’s statement to the military court in Ft. Meade about his motivations for leaking over 700,000 government documents to WikiLeaks.

In his statement Bradley Manning not only explains his motivation for leaking documents to WikiLeaks (he contacted the Washington Post and the New York Times first), but also technically how he went about doing it, including the software and protocols he used.

This clip, about his use of Tor, stood out to me:

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Using Gajim Instead of Pidgin for More Secure OTR Chat

I’ve been using Pidgin as my chat client for many years. The one feature of Pidgin that I care about more than any other is that it supports Off-the-Record (OTR).

If you don’t know about OTR, it’s awesome. It lets you have end-to-end encrypted chat sessions with people so that only you and the person you’re chatting with can read the chat messages and all other parties—such as your chat server (often Google), your ISP, or anyone else eavesdropping on your—cannot. It also has cool features like forward secrecy that other cryptosystems like PGP don’t have. If you’ve ever been to a CryptoParty, setting up Pidgin and OTR and learning how to verify keys is always on the schedule.

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People Seem to Care About Why I Switched from Ubuntu to Debian

About a month ago I decided to rent a $16/month VPS from Gandi, hosted in Paris, that I’ve been using to run a fast Tor exit node called gollum. I wanted to tunnel my Thunderbird, Pidgin, and IRC traffic through gollum as well, but realized that that wasn’t a good idea. Tor recommends that you don’t mix personal traffic with exit traffic, not to mention freenode and other IRC networks block Tor exits.

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Mobile Location Anonymity: Proxying Twitter, IM, and Email through Tor on Android

Each time your computer makes a connection to a server on the internet, you tell the remote server, as well as your ISP and every router in between, your IP address. If you’re using the internet on your phone you might be disclosing the IP of your 3G or 4G connection, or the IP of the wifi network you’re connected to.

If your phone checks for new emails or tweets every couple minutes, or keeps up a consistent connection to your instant messenger server, any of those services is almost definitely logging a history of your IP addresses.

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Why I’m Leaving Ubuntu for Debian

I decided to switch to Debian.

I’ve been using Ubuntu as my primary operating system since 2005. Back then it was truly amazing. Before I started using Ubuntu I tried out Red Hat, Mandrake (and later Mandriva), Slackware, Gentoo, and even Debian. In all of them, something didn’t work. Usually it was wifi, but sometimes it was audio or video, or weird X config problems. But when I switched to Ubuntu, all of that went away. Rather than being frusturated that I was still a Linux noob and couldn’t even connect to the internet, Ubuntu helped me get past the initial barriers so I could really dive in. I’m eternally grateful to Ubuntu for this, and I’m very impressed at how successful they’ve has been at fixing bug #1 (though there’s still a long way to go).

However, a lot of Ubuntu’s recent decisions have been turning me off. It started a couple years ago when they changed the default desktop environment from GNOME to Unity. I had played with Unity when it was called “Ubuntu Netbook Remix” and I thought it was a fun toy, and might be easier to use on a touchscreen device than GNOME. But they made it the default before it was ready. Still, I saw where they were going with it and respected them for being so ambitious.

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No Really, the NSA Can’t Brute Force Your Crypto

National Security ServerI’ve talked to many people who assume that the NSA, the world’s most powerful and well-funded spy agency, can easily crack the encryption on messages they intercept by brute force. They speculate: “What if Big Brother has a massive cluster of supercomputers guessing keys at full power in a top secret and shadowy lab a mile beneath Maryland?” Even then, they still can’t crack your crypto.

Don’t get me wrong. There are many implementation flaws, bugs, misconfigurations, user errors, and rubber hose attacks that could lead to crypto being compromised. I’m referring to the NSA’s ability to use massive computing power to guess a crypto key.

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Beefing Up Security on Your SSH Server

Lately I’ve been thinking about setting up a blog to talk about tech things I find interesting, particularly web security, since that’s how I spend a lot of my work and free time. Since I had an under-used VPS sitting around, I figured I ought to set up WordPress on it and start blogging. What better topic to blog about than how I’m securely setting up this website?

I’m going to start by talking about how to harden SSH. In later posts I’ll talk about how I set up Apache, install an SSL certificate and configure it for maximum security, and some WordPress security tricks. I’m using Debian, but it shouldn’t be hard to adapt this to any Linux distro. I’m assuming you have root access to your server.

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