Monthly Archives: February 2013

Using Gajim Instead of Pidgin for More Secure OTR Chat

I’ve been using Pidgin as my chat client for many years. The one feature of Pidgin that I care about more than any other is that it supports Off-the-Record (OTR).

If you don’t know about OTR, it’s awesome. It lets you have end-to-end encrypted chat sessions with people so that only you and the person you’re chatting with can read the chat messages and all other parties—such as your chat server (often Google), your ISP, or anyone else eavesdropping on your—cannot. It also has cool features like forward secrecy that other cryptosystems like PGP don’t have. If you’ve ever been to a CryptoParty, setting up Pidgin and OTR and learning how to verify keys is always on the schedule.

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People Seem to Care About Why I Switched from Ubuntu to Debian

About a month ago I decided to rent a $16/month VPS from Gandi, hosted in Paris, that I’ve been using to run a fast Tor exit node called gollum. I wanted to tunnel my Thunderbird, Pidgin, and IRC traffic through gollum as well, but realized that that wasn’t a good idea. Tor recommends that you don’t mix personal traffic with exit traffic, not to mention freenode and other IRC networks block Tor exits.

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Mobile Location Anonymity: Proxying Twitter, IM, and Email through Tor on Android

Each time your computer makes a connection to a server on the internet, you tell the remote server, as well as your ISP and every router in between, your IP address. If you’re using the internet on your phone you might be disclosing the IP of your 3G or 4G connection, or the IP of the wifi network you’re connected to.

If your phone checks for new emails or tweets every couple minutes, or keeps up a consistent connection to your instant messenger server, any of those services is almost definitely logging a history of your IP addresses.

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